Mirabilia Urbis Tours: Discover the Wonders of Rome

Rome Walking Tours

Treat yourself to one or more private walking tours!  A variety of itineraries will tickle your fancy, whether you want to talk about the spice trade over an ancient Roman lunch, discuss quality engineering while crossing a bridge built in 130 A.D., follow the evolution of Christian art in mosaic-spangled churches, or giggle at the risque interior decorating of a Renaissance villa.  Choose the private visits that most interest you and their themes will come alive, whether you’re a single traveler, a couple, a family with kids, or a school groups.

Daniella Hunt is an experienced and friendly American guide, who will offer you the benefit of her training, her ongoing research, her many years in Rome, and her linguistic expertise.  If this is your first trip to Rome, one or more private visits with her will make “the standards” unforgettable.  If you’ve been to Rome numerous times, she’ll gladly accompany you to less frequented attractions.  In either case, she is willing to tailor visits to meet your needs.

Whatever visits you choose, Daniella will awaken your interests and deepen your appreciation of Rome.  While meandering through the city’s spectacular side-streets, artistic attractions, and archeological areas, you’ll start feeling Roman yourself!

What does “Mirabilia Urbis” mean?

Guidebooks are nothing new. Around 1000 A.D., pilgrims, travelers and merchants coming to Rome were already using several different guidebooks (such as the one shown in the illustration to the right) to find and enjoy the Eternal City’s treasures. Mirabilia Urbis was just one of many titles that were circulating back then. The author of its contents, which are in Latin, remains anonymous.  Its title, Mirabilia Urbis, means “The Marvels of the City” — “the City” is Rome, of course!

Mirabilia Urbis Walking Tours welcomes you to Rome and explains the sights you want to see using as many primary sources as possible.  After all, the best explanation of “the City’s” monuments and history is going to come from the biographers, poets, historians and everyday people who have lived here over the centuries…

For more information about Daniella Hunt, please visit her account on Facebook and Linked In

Explore some of my private tours – Click here to see more

Monte Testaccio — Imperial Rome’s Broken Pottery Garbage Heap

In Imperial Rome, you could do a lot with an amphora, like using it repeatedly to store and transport dry goods. If it broke, you could use it as lightweight filler in concrete. You could grind it down and reform it -- tedious, but true! And if it were slathered with olive oil that would slowly deteriorate and stink? Well, you could turn it into a mountain by breaking it into pieces and gluing them together with lime!

Bernini and Borromini, Dueling Geniuses

Rivalry fueled Bernini and Borromini's genius. Nearly the same age, they had wildly different temperaments: Borromini dressed in an ostentatious (and out-of-fashion) "Spanish style," cultivated his studies ptivately, and unintentionally alienated his patrons. He put an end to his tormented career by committing suicide. Bernini, who lived to a venerable old age, surrounded by family and friends, was a personable mad-hatter with public relations skills in overdrive!

Monte Testaccio — Imperial Rome’s Broken Pottery Garbage Heap

In Imperial Rome, you could do a lot with an amphora, like using it repeatedly to store and transport dry goods. If it broke, you could use it as lightweight filler in concrete. You could grind it down and reform it -- tedious, but true! And if it were slathered with olive oil that would slowly deteriorate and stink? Well, you could turn it into a mountain by breaking it into pieces and gluing them together with lime!

Bernini and Borromini, Dueling Geniuses

Rivalry fueled Bernini and Borromini's genius. Nearly the same age, they had wildly different temperaments: Borromini dressed in an ostentatious (and out-of-fashion) "Spanish style," cultivated his studies ptivately, and unintentionally alienated his patrons. He put an end to his tormented career by committing suicide. Bernini, who lived to a venerable old age, surrounded by family and friends, was a personable mad-hatter with public relations skills in overdrive!

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